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Glass Tile Backsplash

Glass tile backsplash is one of the most popular looks in contemporary kitchens. Glass tiles help every kitchen look bigger and brighter, which is particularly advantageous for small kitchens or

Kitchen Backsplash Tile

Many people think of kitchen backsplash tile as a purely decorative innovation. Backsplashes have a practical purpose too, though. They’re installed behind sinks or stoves. Before backsplashes became popular, water

Backsplash Tile

Backsplash refers to a covering applied to walls behind a sink or a stove. When water from the sink, or hot sizzling cooking oil, splatters against these surfaces, it leaves

Glass Mosaic Tile

When people think of glass mosaic tile, they’re usually thinking of smalti tile, small, highly colored iridescent bits of glass that were originally created for use in Byzantine mosaics. Smalti

Glass Tile Backsplash

Glass tile backsplash is one of the most popular looks in contemporary kitchens. Glass tiles help every kitchen look bigger and brighter, which is particularly advantageous for small kitchens or kitchens that tend to be dark. Glass is also very easy to clean, which makes it ideal for the enthusiastic home chef whose walls are frequently splattered with sprays of hot cooking oil. Glass is nonflammable, and nonflammable materials are safest for cooks with gas stoves.

Glass tile backsplash is available in a wide assortment of colors, textures and shapes. Glass is not porous, which means it’s resistant to mildew, mold and fungal growth. Glass tiles make for a more sanitary food preparation environment.

Installing a Glass Tile Backsplash

Glass tiles are generally pricier than ceramic tiles, though not as expensive as stone and certain metallic tiles. Glass is also more fragile. When you’re buying glass tile for a kitchen backsplash, it’s always important to buy approximately ten percent over the amount you’ve calculated you need, in case of breakage.

It’s very important to install glass tile precisely. Glass tiles can be extremely difficult to cut if you need one that’s an unusual shape. Glass tile shows inexpert workmanship more keenly than other types of tile. Glass also scratches easily, so you must be careful putting tiles near sharp objects.

Glass expands and contracts with fluctuations in ambient temperature levels more than other types of tile do. This is particularly true when tiles are installed in areas close to heat sources. Make sure that the grout is thicker in those areas to accommodate the variance in size.

Glass is extremely easy to clean, but it also shows fingerprints and dirt very easily. That means your glass tile backsplash will need frequent cleaning.

Kitchen Backsplash Tile

Many people think of kitchen backsplash tile as a purely decorative innovation. Backsplashes have a practical purpose too, though. They’re installed behind sinks or stoves. Before backsplashes became popular, water or hot cooking oil splatters would often leave marks on the paint or wallpaper on these parts of a kitchen’s walls.

In the past few years, backsplashes have become the defining feature of the contemporary kitchen. There are no hard and fast rules about their design. A kitchen can have one backsplash, or it can have several backsplashes. Extended backsplashes can also be implemented to add cohesiveness to a kitchen that otherwise lacks an integrated look.

What’s the Best Backsplash Tile for Your Kitchen?

There are many different shapes, colors and textures of backsplash tile. Here are some pointers for choosing the kitchen backsplash tile that’s right for your home.

Metallic tiles: If your kitchen is tiny, you may want to go with a metallic backsplash tile to add depth. Metallic tile also has the advantage of magnetism. Many people hang canisters off their metal kitchen backsplash tile. After all, the prime directive in a space-challenged kitchen is to make practical use of every inch.

Glass tiles: Glass kitchen backsplash tiles will make your kitchen seem brighter, and are therefore ideal for dark kitchens. Mirrored tiles are becoming increasingly popular in kitchens.

Ceramic tiles: Ceramic tiles are extremely easy to clean, and so work well behind stoves that see a lot of use and a lot of splattered kitchen oil. Like glass tiles, ceramic tiles are stain-resistant for the most part.

In contrast, many natural stone tiles, particularly those made of limestone, stain easily. If you don’t want to spend more than five minutes a day cleaning your backsplash, stick with ceramic tiles.

Backsplash Tile

Backsplash refers to a covering applied to walls behind a sink or a stove. When water from the sink, or hot sizzling cooking oil, splatters against these surfaces, it leaves marks on paint and wallpaper. Several years ago, interior designers began configuring kitchens in a way that would make these surfaces easier to clean, or disguise the back splatter altogether. The result? Backsplashes!

Today’s backsplashes are tiled areas in the kitchen or bathroom that act as focal points for the room. Dramatic backsplash tile can showcase special features of the room, such as a designer sink or a stainless steel stove. They are a relatively inexpensive way to update the look and feel of a kitchen.

Backsplash tiles work in almost every kitchen because there is such a great variety in the different types of available tiles.

Tips for Choosing the Right Kitchen Backsplash

Here are two things to think about as you consider what backsplash tile will best fit your kitchen.

• Cleaning: Glass and ceramic tiles are generally resistant to stains, so cleaning won’t be particularly complicated. Certain types of stone tiles, however, are porous, which means they stain easily. This is particularly true of travertine tiles and other types of limestone.

If you cook a lot, avoid textured tile backsplashes in back of your kitchen. Grease will splatter from your pans into the tiles’ crannies. It could take you hours to clean those tiles properly.

• Style: Trends in home décor come and go relatively fast. Backsplash tiles that look great now may look very outdated five years from now when you are trying to sell your house. That could be an issue for potential buyers. Pick a classical backsplash tile accent that will still look great in years to come.

Glass Mosaic Tile

When people think of glass mosaic tile, they’re usually thinking of smalti tile, small, highly colored iridescent bits of glass that were originally created for use in Byzantine mosaics.

Smalti glass was created by adding metal oxides and other minerals to vats of molten glass. The molten glass was then poured into slabs and cooled, and the cooled glass cut into tiles known as tesserae.

The ancient Romans were the first to use tesserae in decorative panels and floor mosaics, but the Byzantines elevated the use of these glass mosaic tiles to an art form. One of the Byzantines’ favorite techniques was to place a delicate piece of gold foil between two glass tiles, thus creating a shimmering, luminous effect.

Today, similar smalti tiles are used to create the delicate millefiore and Murano glass for which Venice is so famous. This beautiful hand-cut glass is used as a basis for a wide variety of decorative objects, from jewelry to glass to paperweights.

Contemporary Glass Mosaic Tile

These days, glass tile is a popular addition to kitchens and bathrooms where it’s used to create backsplashes and other wall coverings. Glass surfacing has a great advantage when it comes to rooms where moisture is an issue because it doesn’t absorb water, meaning that it eliminates the risk that mildew or molds will germinate. Glass tile also comes in a wide variety of colors and styles.

The glass used in contemporary kitchens and bathrooms is typically manufactured using a fusion process. Large sheets of glass are manufactured in factories, and then cut into tile-sized pieces and fired. Color is added in a thin sheen to the front or the back of the glass tiles. More complex images can also be applied to these glass tiles.